64 Years Of Resistance And Counting: Montgomery Unveils Rosa Parks Memorial Statue

64 Years Of Resistance And Counting: Montgomery Unveils Rosa Parks Memorial Statue

The first Blck mayor of the city unveiled the statue.

History has a way of reminding us of the people who paved the way for us to be where we are. And in a befitting situation, the first Black Mayor of Montgomery, Steven Reed, unveiled the memorial statue of Rosa Parks, whose sparks of resistance still burns bright among those still facing the brunt of oppression.

64 years ago, it was on Dec. 1, 1955, that Rosa Parks refused to vacate her seat on the bus, that was already in the 'colored section,' for a white passenger and was arrested as a result. Such was the spark of her resistance that her arrest was followed by a widespread public outrage and boycott of buses for 381 days. 

The Browder vs. Gayle case, that emerged a year after her arrest, eventually led to the court ruling that segregation in the buses was unconstitutional under the Equal Protection Clause of the 14th Amendment. Her simple act of defiance is still one of the most inspiring acts and also became a rallying point in numerous civil rights movements. 

Rosa Parks passed away in 2005, at the age of 92, but her legacy still continues. The statue marked the 64th anniversary of the day she took a stand and spoke out loud.

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