"I have no respect for your ancestors": Law Professor Shuts Down Caller's White Pride With A Simple Answer

"I have no respect for your ancestors": Law Professor Shuts Down Caller's White Pride With A Simple Answer

Prof. Butler's takeaway was simple: When a white person says that they honor their ancestors, or when they talk about white supremacy, Black people are expected to treat it gently, forgivingly, and lovingly. But that only makes the circle of white privilege take its course yet again.  

The history of Black people is colored with injustice, enslavement, violence, and bias. The struggle was real and it is something that the community takes pride in, and rightfully so. But when a Black person voices the pride and encouragement that their ancestors gave them, there is bound to be one white person who says that their ancestors' past is equally encouraging and empowering. 

Factually, the history of white people in American history has been marred by racial bias, bigotry, and hatred. Many take immense pride in their Confederate history, especially about the flag of their forefathers. One white woman tried to explain why white pride was equally important, but Professor Paul Butler, a professor at the Georgetown University Law Center, decided to put her in place. 



 

The caller was speaking on an NPR show when she said that gun violence needs to be taken into account by focusing on gun control instead of being sidetracked by confederate culture and its imagery. "I'm not somebody who thinks the battle flag should stay there, but I certainly honor my ancestors," she stated. 



 

In a to-the-point rebuttal, Prof. Butler said: "I have no respect for your ancestors. As far as your ancestors are concerned, I shouldn't be a law professor at Georgetown. I should be a slave. That's why they fought that war. I don't understand what it meant to be proud of a legacy of terrorism and violence."



 

He continued: "Last week at this time, I was in Israel. The idea that a German would say: 'You know, that thing we did call the Holocaust, that was wrong, but I respect the courage of the Nazi ancestors,' that wouldn't happen. The reason people can say what you said, in the United States, is because, again, black life just doesn’t matter to a lot of people."



 

Prof. Butler's takeaway was simple: When a white person says that they honor their ancestors, or when they talk about white supremacy, Black people are expected to treat it gently, forgivingly, and lovingly. But that only makes the circle of white privilege take its course yet again.  

Watch the interview here: 



 

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