The Icon Of Civil Rights Had Her Own Federal Agent Escorts For School

The Icon Of Civil Rights Had Her Own Federal Agent Escorts For School

At the young age of six years old, Bridges became an icon of the civil rights movement when she was the first African American to attend an all-white school. 

Ruby Bridges was the youngest participant in a movement that would eventually see to the desegregation of schools in America. At the young age of six years old, Bridges became an icon of the civil rights movement when she was the first African American to attend an all-white school. 



 

Born on September 8, 1954, Bridges is the oldest of five children, born to Abon and Lucille Bridges. Her parents eventually moved from Tylertown, Mississippi, to New Orleans, Louisiana. Ruby's birth year was also the same year that the US Supreme Court passed the landmark ruling of Brown v. the Board of Education, which saw to the end of the segregation of public schools. 



 

Despite the landmark ruling, many southern states still resisted desegregation. Bridges were one of five children who passed the exam that determined the students who would be studying on the all-white Frantz Elementary school. For the duration of the year, Bridges and her mother were escorted by federal agents to make sure no harm would come to them. Bridges and her mother walked past angry crowds that would shout angry slurs at the pair.



 

She would go on to graduate from the desegregated school and over the years, many other African Americans would enroll in the public school system because of desegregation. Her own nieces would also eventually study in the same school that she made an impact on years down the line. 



 

Bridges would go on to participate voraciously in human rights activism and in 1999, she established The Ruby Bridges Foundation which is set to promote tolerance and create change through education. Her phenomenal work also earned her the title of honorary deputy marshal in a ceremony in 2000. 

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