Teens Planned To Blow Up School; Get 40 Years In Prison, But Will Serve At Least 20

Teens Planned To Blow Up School; Get 40 Years In Prison, But Will Serve At Least 20

In 2017, Victoria McCurley and Alfred Dupree planned to blow up the Etowah High School. The pair initially faced 90 years in prison.

Two teenagers who had pleaded guilty for plotting to kill their classmates by blowing up their school will be serving 20 years in prison after a judge passed the sentence on Tuesday.

In 2017, Victoria McCurley and Alfred Dupree planned to blow up the Etowah High School. The pair initially faced 90 years in prison. However, Dupree, 19 and McCurly, 18, were slapped with a sentence of 40 years in prison but will be required to serve at least 20.



 

The two of them plead guilty to six counts of conspiracy to commit murder along with several other felony charges much ahead of their trial that took place last week. News channels reporting the trail state that the judge believed in rehabilitation as well as keeping the community safe.



 

As she handed down the sentence to McCurley and Dupree, the judge said: "The court must take into account the safety of the community knowing that any release without you being treated puts everybody at risk."



 

At the trial, the students showed remorse for the first time while they were issuing their statement. Both Dupree and McCurley apologized for their planned attack. "I need help," Dupree said as he read a prepared statement. "I want to be treated for the problems I have. I understand I need punishment, but at some point, I do want to move forward with my life, not in this community, because of the pain and fear I've given them."



 

The trial spanned over the course of three days during which prosecutors read out several journal entries written by Dupree as well as McCurly about their explicitly-detailed plans to attack a list of students as well as a teacher.



 

Dupree also took an opportunity to apologize to his family as well as his targetted victims. Psychologists working with the defendants confirmed that each of them had suffered from mental health issues, suicidal thoughts, as well as tough home lives.



 

"When writing and doing these things, I was in a much darker place with my self-hatred," admitted Dupree in his statement. "The whole situation was childish and irrational. It was not something that I understand I did what I did," echoed McCurley in hers.

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