Watch: When Toni Morrison Schooled A White Journalist On Her White Privilege

Watch: When Toni Morrison Schooled A White Journalist On Her White Privilege

In the short clip, Morrison cuts through interviewer Jana Wendt's question and holds the Australian journalist accountable for a powerfully racist question that only a black literary figure would be subjected to. 

A 1998 interview with late authoress and Nobel Prize winner Toni Morrison is winning the hearts of countless people online. Marc Lamont, co-host of BET's Black Coffee, shared the poignant clip from the documentary 'Toni Morrison: Uncensored' in the wake of the legendary writer's passing on Monday night. 



 

In the short clip, Morrison cuts through interviewer Jana Wendt's question and holds the Australian journalist accountable for a powerfully racist question that only a black literary figure would be subjected to. 



 

"You don't think you'll ever change and write books that incorporate white lives into them substantially?" asks Wendt. Without a pause, Morrison replies: "I have done." When the journalist asks Morrison if it was done in a substantial way, the literary legend plainly asks: "You can't understand how powerfully racist that question is, can you? Because you could never ask a white author, 'When are you going to write about black people?' Whether he did or not, or she did or not. Even the inquiry comes from the position of being in the center."



 



 

Wendt pays close attention to what Morrison has to say and adds: "And being used to being in the center". Understanding her fault, Wendt ends the comment. "It's inconceivable that where I already am is the mainstream," Morrison firmly adds before the clip ends.



 

Her poignant words resonated deeply with the internet, and people online grew further in awe of the legendary Morrison. The clip was also widely shared on Twitter and was immensely praised by people. 



 



 

Morrison was 88 years old when she passed away on Monday, following a short battle with an illness. She was the first black woman to be awarded the Nobel Peace Prize in Literature. Morrison authored several books and her most celebrated work 'Beloved', was adapted for a film starring Oprah Winfrey. 

Recommended for you